Nathan East 的 MagiChorus TonePrint

ith the Corona Chorus, Nathan wanted to maintain a subtle tone that would not overpower the original sound of the bass. It had to be a sound that could help sustain notes in ballads without being too 'wobbly'. The TonePrint ended up having a magical aura, hence the name 'MagiChorus'.

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Nathan East's "Magic Chorus" TonePrint for Corona Chorus

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When Nathan East joined us to create his TonePrints he brought along a clear vision for what he wanted. He feels that “when you are a bass player and you pull out a pedal, listeners are going to be a bit more weary of the change in your sound because everybody loves to feel the bass.” As a result of this Nathan wanted to keep a subtle tone for this TonePrint creations. TonePrints that would sound great but be usable above all else.

TC: I actually didn’t think that bass players used delays or echo’s that much? NE: Not a lot but when you can get that sound that is really cool for soloing or something other than just playing the bass line, then it’s great.

TC: What type of sound are you looking for? NE: I am looking for a very inspiring, sweet sound where you get a bit of a delay and one that is just very atmospheric.

TC: How would you describe the sound? NE: It’s a very mood enhancing solo sound.

TC: Do you get to solo a lot? NE: It depends on the situation but yes I am asked to solo more these days. Frequently bass solos get a bit too flashy and that’s where I think people get bored. That’s why I like the more lyrical & melodic solos.

TC: Do you have a name for the TonePrint? NE: Let's call it The East Solo Sound for now.

TC: We dialed back everything a bit compared to how a guitar player would use it. Just so that it is more subtle. We also took the TonePrint you did for the Corona Chorus and put it on the delay repeater so that there is a little bit of a swirly sound. NE: This is turning into a very personalized sound. I love it.

During our interview with him, we discovered a lot of interesting facts about Nathan’s collaborations and the people who have shaped his career.

TC: Where did you start playing bass? NE: I was born in Philadelphia but moved to San Diego at an early age and I have had influences from Philadelphia but I picked up the bass in a church in San Diego. From then I started joining all the local bands there and one of our groups was heard by Barry White, so he hired the whole band to tour the country.

TC: Who have you collaborated with? NE: I started recording on all of Barry White’s records. Through the grapevine I was recommended for many great sessions here in LA. I worked on Madonna’s first record as well as Whitney Houston & Anita Baker's debut records. Hubert Laws, Patrice Rushen, Billy Cobham; where I started working in the jazz idiom. Phil Collins rang to do something in the studio with him in London; we wrote the song “Easy Lover” with Philip Bailey; and he introduced me to Eric Clapton. I received a call from Bob James at the recommendation of Harvey Mason and Lee Ritenour, and we formed the contemporary jazz quartet Fourplay currently celebrating our 20th Anniversary! Later collaborations include Lionel Richie, Michael Jackson, Joe Satriani, Kenny Loggins and Stevie Wonder. TC: It’s almost easier to say who you didn’t play with.

TC: Do you have any advice to young people looking for your kind of career? NE: Number one is always try to stay on your game and keep your eyes, ears & mind open. Listen to everything. I think it's good to have a wide variety of styles and genres that you understand. Lastly, make as many friends and connections as possible.

TC: Did you practice incessantly? NE: Not so crazy. In the early days I would play along with records that I liked but I was always gigging from an early age so I learned whilst I earned.

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